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goggledoddle:

Christopher Wren’s 382nd Birthday
 
Today, Date: October 20, 2014
It took 33 years to build St. Paul’s Cathedral in London but today, on our homepage in the U.K, it happens in a matter of seconds. 
Completed in 1720, the cathedral is considered to be English architect Christopher Wren’s magnum opus. But, with a portfolio featuring British landmarks like the Royal Observatory of Greenwich and Kensington Palace, Wren’s legacy stands tall throughout England. 
Happy 382nd birthday to Christopher Wren!
Location: City of London, United Kingdom
on GoogleDoodles & goggledoddle

goggledoddle:

Christopher Wren’s 382nd Birthday

Christopher Wren's 382nd Birthday

Today, Date: October 20, 2014

It took 33 years to build St. Paul’s Cathedral in London but today, on our homepage in the U.K, it happens in a matter of seconds.

Completed in 1720, the cathedral is considered to be English architect Christopher Wren’s magnum opus. But, with a portfolio featuring British landmarks like the Royal Observatory of Greenwich and Kensington Palace, Wren’s legacy stands tall throughout England.

Happy 382nd birthday to Christopher Wren!

Location: City of London, United Kingdom

on GoogleDoodles & goggledoddle

7 Notes

goggledoddle:

60th anniversary of the unveiling of the first Routemaster bus
 
Date: September 24, 2014
The wheels on this bus have been going round and round for 60 years! On this day in 1954, London Transport unveiled its first Routemaster bus, better known as the double decker bus. Since then, the buses have become an internationally recognized symbol of England.
Location: United Kingdom
Tags: double decker, transportation, bus, public transportation, animation, wheels, red
http://ift.tt/v9YN86

goggledoddle:

60th anniversary of the unveiling of the first Routemaster bus

60th anniversary of the unveiling of the first Routemaster bus

Date: September 24, 2014

The wheels on this bus have been going round and round for 60 years! On this day in 1954, London Transport unveiled its first Routemaster bus, better known as the double decker bus. Since then, the buses have become an internationally recognized symbol of England.

Location: United Kingdom

Tags: double decker, transportation, bus, public transportation, animation, wheels, red

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

1 Notes

The Internet In Real-Time
How Quickly Data is Generated

1 Notes

Valentine’s Day 2014 (US) 

  
     
  Date: Feb. 14, 2014
  
  

With a culture that values creativity and technology, Google is used to decorating our homepage for national holidays and historical figures.  When Ira Glass, of This American Life, slammed his hand on the conference table and smiled, “Why can’t we feature a random person?” the doodlers and I thought he was crazy.  I believe we laughed and moved the conversation on quickly— none of us thought the logo space that celebrates people like Harriet Tubman could also feature a random person.  Ira and This American Life, however, were onto something.  





Specializing in extracting extraordinary stories from regular people for his public radio show, Ira proposed a doodle that features stories of love for Valentine’s day.  It isn’t “a random person,” it is a collection of unique people, all of whom have their own experiences with love— whether fleeting or devoted, silly or life-changing.





We invite Ira himself to write about his experiences collaborating with the doodle team on this celebration of average people with beautiful stories about love.





Posted by Jennifer Hom, doodler





My favorite moment working with the Google team on these Valentine’s Day stories came during an early conference call. We were talking about how we needed music to put under the voices. Should we commission original pieces for this or just license music that’s out there already? 





Of course, to license music, you need to estimate how many people will hear it. The more people, the more you pay.





“How many people will come to the Google homepage that day?” I asked.





“That would be a zillion,” someone said. “That’s the number we like to use.”





They were joking about how many zeroes are in that figure but you get the point. Licensing wasn’t an option.





Later I was talking with the composer we found, Roger Neill, about the assignment. Roger does scores for movies and tv shows, including one of my favorite film scores, for the movie Beginners.  Sometimes we use this insanely great piano piece from that soundtrack on our radio show.





Anyway, Roger and I were talking about how we’d better do a good job on this, because more people would see these little love stories than anything we’d ever do in our regular work lives. Yes, radio and TV and movies get audiences in the millions. This was bigger.





I’ve been a fan of Google Doodles for a while (though I only recently learned they had a name and that their name is Google Doodles). I liked that they seemed able to do anything on their homepage, a crossword puzzle, a Dr Who video game, a tribute to Saul Bass, a Les Paul guitar and a fully functioning Moog Synthesizer (with its own four-track tape recorder). This Doodle is their first foray into documentary storytelling and I hope they do more stuff like it. I hope they reach out to Wes Anderson and Laurie Anderson and Anderson Cooper and artists whose names are not Anderson as future collaborators.





We made seven mini-love stories for the Google team but because there are only six letters in Google, one had to be cut. It’s pretty great though, a little fable about love, and it’s here: 

        Your browser does not support the audio tag.
       
Three of the love stories have appeared on our radio show, in much longer forms, Puppy Love was part of a much bigger story about middle school dances, in an episode about Middle School, Crush is the opening of this episode, and Kiss is here. That’s comedian Mike Birbiglia doing the interview in Blind Date, part of a story he’s putting together for an upcoming episode. The last two interviews were done by Miki Meek, one of our producers here at the radio show, who was my partner in making the audio for these Six love stories. 





Miki and I didn’t see any of the animations till this week and we both think the animators did a spectacular job. Before they began, the only general guideline we all thought would be smart was that the artists shouldn’t just illustrate what the people were saying. The images wouldn’t add enough to the experience if they were literally just showing what the interviewers were describing. (This is something cartoonist Chris Ware was concerned with when he made animated cartoons of This American Life stories for us, years ago.) I love what the Doodle staff came up with. The non-literalness is what makes them great. Some of the animations are like comic riffs on what’s being said. The people appear as dogs or hearts. And when the stories get sad, they nail that too. 





One weird thing about creating audio for the Internet is that making it sound good coming out of a laptop’s or desktop’s speakers is an art in and of itself – and very different than mixing for car radio or podcast. Honestly we had no idea how to do it, so I was grateful for Jeff Seelye from Dig It Audio to take that over.





If you’re reading this on the Google blog and you’ve never heard of our radio show, we’re on every week, and we do all kinds of stories. Big investigative stories, funny little personal stories. We sent three reporters into a high school that’d had 29 shootings in one year. Our free weekly podcast is here.  Probably the best place to start to get to know us is our favorites page, here.  We’re non-profit, with no commercials. Like public TV, but no pictures and no muppets.





This Valentine’s Day project happened because I was in San Francisco in November, and got a tour of Google’s headquarters, and met with the Doodle team. They reminded me of the radio show’s staff, the general vibe of the group, and the sense that they’re out to amuse themselves and make whatever will be fun or moving. I think our staff size is about the same too, roughly a dozen people. It’s a weird and idealistic corner in a weird and idealistic company. There was a general sort of “hey wouldn’t it be fun to try to collaborate on something together?” They pitched July 4th as a good possibility. We counter-pitched Valentine’s Day, because the stories could be more emotional. That kind of freaked them out, to have to turn so many little animations around so quickly. They weren’t sure it could be done. Now three months later, here we are. Incredible. Valentine’s Day is a day for love and these stories are a labor of love.





Posted by Ira Glass, of This American Life



  
  Location:
     
       
         United States
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
      heart,
    
      National Holiday,
    
      love,
    
      candy,
    
      Animation,
    
      hearts,
    
      Interactive
    
  

       http://ift.tt/v9YN86
Valentine’s Day 2014 (US)

Valentine's Day 2014 (US)

Date: Feb. 14, 2014

With a culture that values creativity and technology, Google is used to decorating our homepage for national holidays and historical figures.  When Ira Glass, of This American Life, slammed his hand on the conference table and smiled, “Why can’t we feature a random person?” the doodlers and I thought he was crazy.  I believe we laughed and moved the conversation on quickly— none of us thought the logo space that celebrates people like Harriet Tubman could also feature a random person.  Ira and This American Life, however, were onto something.  

Specializing in extracting extraordinary stories from regular people for his public radio show, Ira proposed a doodle that features stories of love for Valentine’s day.  It isn’t “a random person,” it is a collection of unique people, all of whom have their own experiences with love— whether fleeting or devoted, silly or life-changing.

We invite Ira himself to write about his experiences collaborating with the doodle team on this celebration of average people with beautiful stories about love.

Posted by Jennifer Hom, doodler

My favorite moment working with the Google team on these Valentine’s Day stories came during an early conference call. We were talking about how we needed music to put under the voices. Should we commission original pieces for this or just license music that’s out there already?

Of course, to license music, you need to estimate how many people will hear it. The more people, the more you pay.

“How many people will come to the Google homepage that day?” I asked.

“That would be a zillion,” someone said. “That’s the number we like to use.”

They were joking about how many zeroes are in that figure but you get the point. Licensing wasn’t an option.

Later I was talking with the composer we found, Roger Neill, about the assignment. Roger does scores for movies and tv shows, including one of my favorite film scores, for the movie Beginners. Sometimes we use this insanely great piano piece from that soundtrack on our radio show.

Anyway, Roger and I were talking about how we’d better do a good job on this, because more people would see these little love stories than anything we’d ever do in our regular work lives. Yes, radio and TV and movies get audiences in the millions. This was bigger.

I’ve been a fan of Google Doodles for a while (though I only recently learned they had a name and that their name is Google Doodles). I liked that they seemed able to do anything on their homepage, a crossword puzzle, a Dr Who video game, a tribute to Saul Bass, a Les Paul guitar and a fully functioning Moog Synthesizer (with its own four-track tape recorder). This Doodle is their first foray into documentary storytelling and I hope they do more stuff like it. I hope they reach out to Wes Anderson and Laurie Anderson and Anderson Cooper and artists whose names are not Anderson as future collaborators.

We made seven mini-love stories for the Google team but because there are only six letters in Google, one had to be cut. It’s pretty great though, a little fable about love, and it’s here: 

 

Three of the love stories have appeared on our radio show, in much longer forms, Puppy Love was part of a much bigger story about middle school dances, in an episode about Middle School, Crush is the opening of this episode, and Kiss is here. That’s comedian Mike Birbiglia doing the interview in Blind Date, part of a story he’s putting together for an upcoming episode. The last two interviews were done by Miki Meek, one of our producers here at the radio show, who was my partner in making the audio for these Six love stories.

Miki and I didn’t see any of the animations till this week and we both think the animators did a spectacular job. Before they began, the only general guideline we all thought would be smart was that the artists shouldn’t just illustrate what the people were saying. The images wouldn’t add enough to the experience if they were literally just showing what the interviewers were describing. (This is something cartoonist Chris Ware was concerned with when he made animated cartoons of This American Life stories for us, years ago.) I love what the Doodle staff came up with. The non-literalness is what makes them great. Some of the animations are like comic riffs on what’s being said. The people appear as dogs or hearts. And when the stories get sad, they nail that too.

One weird thing about creating audio for the Internet is that making it sound good coming out of a laptop’s or desktop’s speakers is an art in and of itself – and very different than mixing for car radio or podcast. Honestly we had no idea how to do it, so I was grateful for Jeff Seelye from Dig It Audio to take that over.

If you’re reading this on the Google blog and you’ve never heard of our radio show, we’re on every week, and we do all kinds of stories. Big investigative stories, funny little personal stories. We sent three reporters into a high school that’d had 29 shootings in one year. Our free weekly podcast is here. Probably the best place to start to get to know us is our favorites page, here. We’re non-profit, with no commercials. Like public TV, but no pictures and no muppets.

This Valentine’s Day project happened because I was in San Francisco in November, and got a tour of Google’s headquarters, and met with the Doodle team. They reminded me of the radio show’s staff, the general vibe of the group, and the sense that they’re out to amuse themselves and make whatever will be fun or moving. I think our staff size is about the same too, roughly a dozen people. It’s a weird and idealistic corner in a weird and idealistic company. There was a general sort of “hey wouldn’t it be fun to try to collaborate on something together?” They pitched July 4th as a good possibility. We counter-pitched Valentine’s Day, because the stories could be more emotional. That kind of freaked them out, to have to turn so many little animations around so quickly. They weren’t sure it could be done. Now three months later, here we are. Incredible. Valentine’s Day is a day for love and these stories are a labor of love.

Posted by Ira Glass, of This American Life

Location: United States

Tags: heart, National Holiday, love, candy, Animation, hearts, Interactive

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

1 Notes

Valentine’s Day 2014 (International) 

  
     
  Date: Feb. 14, 2014
  
  Location:
     
       Global
     
  
  Tags:
    
  

       http://ift.tt/v9YN86
Valentine’s Day 2014 (International)

Valentine's Day 2014 (International)

Date: Feb. 14, 2014

Location: Global

Tags:

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

1 Notes

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2014 

  
     
  Date: Jan. 20, 2014
  
  Location:
     
       
         United States
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
      National Holiday,
    
      MLK,
    
      Guest Artist,
    
      Washington DC,
    
      Lincoln Memorial,
    
      doves,
    
      History
    
  

       http://ift.tt/v9YN86
Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2014

Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2014

Date: Jan. 20, 2014

Location: United States

Tags: National Holiday, MLK, Guest Artist, Washington DC, Lincoln Memorial, doves, History

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

2 Notes

The 255th anniversary of the British Museum 

  
     
  Date: Jan. 15, 2014
  
  Location:
     
       
         United Kingdom
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
      Art,
    
      Great Court,
    
      Museum,
    
      Sciences,
    
      Current Event,
    
      Architecture,
    
      Sculpture,
    
      History
    
  

       http://ift.tt/v9YN86
The 255th anniversary of the British Museum

The 255th anniversary of the British Museum

Date: Jan. 15, 2014

Location: United Kingdom

Tags: Art, Great Court, Museum, Sciences, Current Event, Architecture, Sculpture, History

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

4 Notes

Doctor Who’s 50th Anniversary 

  
     
  Date: Nov. 23, 2013
  
  
The Doctor Who doodle started life as a request from a huge fan at Google. It seemed daunting- 11 Doctor’s, 50 years of adventures, countless enemies and time travel!
But we loved the idea of science fiction, technology and fun coming together, so we set about creating a multiple level game. The game was always a simple premise- those dastardly Daleks have stolen the Google letters and we need Doctor Who to retrieve them.
Artists don’t make games, programmers do. I provided the designs and various pieces of animation but without the engineers the game would only exist in another dimension! I was fortunate to work alongside people that genuinely cared:
Engineering Gurus - Rui Lopes, Corrie Scalisi. Mark Ivey
Additional support - Doug Simpkinson, Jonathan Shneier
All things D of 3 - Leon Hong
Deity of rain, lava & lightning - Kevin Laughlin
Additional game ideas - Gregory Capuano
Sounds - The BBC, Tom Tabanao, Manuel Clement and Cody!
Creative consultant - Chris Dibona
User testing - Jennifer Zamora
We thank the BBC for trusting us and also helping us whenever needed. So what are you waiting for?! Jump in your TARDIS (Time and relative “doodle” in space) and become the fastest time lord in the universe!



























  
  Location:
     
       Global
     
  
  Tags:
    
      Dalek,
    
      Cybermen,
    
      Cemetery,
    
      Tardis,
    
      Weeping Angel,
    
      Game,
    
      Doctor Who,
    
      London,
    
      Time Lord,
    
      Interactive
    
  

       http://ift.tt/v9YN86
Doctor Who’s 50th Anniversary

Doctor Who's 50th Anniversary

Date: Nov. 23, 2013

The Doctor Who doodle started life as a request from a huge fan at Google. It seemed daunting- 11 Doctor’s, 50 years of adventures, countless enemies and time travel!

But we loved the idea of science fiction, technology and fun coming together, so we set about creating a multiple level game. The game was always a simple premise- those dastardly Daleks have stolen the Google letters and we need Doctor Who to retrieve them.

Artists don’t make games, programmers do. I provided the designs and various pieces of animation but without the engineers the game would only exist in another dimension! I was fortunate to work alongside people that genuinely cared:

Engineering Gurus - Rui Lopes, Corrie Scalisi. Mark Ivey
Additional support - Doug Simpkinson, Jonathan Shneier
All things D of 3 - Leon Hong
Deity of rain, lava & lightning - Kevin Laughlin
Additional game ideas - Gregory Capuano
Sounds - The BBC, Tom Tabanao, Manuel Clement and Cody!
Creative consultant - Chris Dibona
User testing - Jennifer Zamora

We thank the BBC for trusting us and also helping us whenever needed. So what are you waiting for?! Jump in your TARDIS (Time and relative “doodle” in space) and become the fastest time lord in the universe!
















Location: Global

Tags: Dalek, Cybermen, Cemetery, Tardis, Weeping Angel, Game, Doctor Who, London, Time Lord, Interactive

http://ift.tt/v9YN86

1 Notes

The Innovation of Loneliness

2 Notes

50th Anniversary of the “I Have a Dream” Speech 

  
     
  Date: Aug. 28, 2013
  
  Location:
     
       
         United States
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
  

       http://bit.ly/v9YN86
50th Anniversary of the “I Have a Dream” Speech

50th Anniversary of the "I Have a Dream" Speech

Date: Aug. 28, 2013

Location: United States

Tags:

http://bit.ly/v9YN86

481 Notes

2 Notes

Maurice Sendak’s 85th Birthday 

  
     
  Date: June 10, 2013
  
  
Admired for his award-winning illustrations and beloved for his imaginative storytelling, Maurice Sendak is an American children’s book legend.  Whether they are monsters stomping through a forest, a boy cruising in a bread plane, or a parade of pigs celebrating a birthday, the unique characters of Sendak’s books have sparked the imaginations of children for decades.  His talents and ambitions, however, are not limited to children’s books.  He also created television shows and designed sets for operas and ballets. 
To honor such a cherished cultural icon is no small task.  How can anyone sing the praises of Maurice Sendak with enough affection?  The doodlers and I decided to let Sendak’s characters do the talking, or the walking rather.  The doodle is a kind of parade— sixteen of his characters march through their stories and gather around a birthday cake decked with candles that read “85.”  Even his dog, Herman, makes an appearance to wish Maurice a warm happy birthday.
Below are some development drawings of the doodle.  As with any story, the doodle starts with storyboards.























The following images illustrate the evolution of the Where the Wild Things Are scene:














Finally, below are the fully-realized background paintings that appear throughout the doodle.  I was lucky enough to have a great collaborator in Mike Dutton for these images!






















We hope that this doodle properly honors a man whose work continues to bring joy to a world of children and adults alike.  




Posted by Jennifer Hom, doodler



  
  Location:
     
       
         Canada,
       
         Turkey,
       
         Qatar,
       
         Kenya,
       
         Kuwait,
       
         France,
       
         Congo [DRC],
       
         Rwanda,
       
         Ireland,
       
         Palestine,
       
         Argentina,
       
         Ghana,
       
         Brunei,
       
         Israel,
       
         Australia,
       
         Singapore,
       
         Senegal,
       
         Zimbabwe,
       
         Jordan,
       
         Germany,
       
         Iraq,
       
         Hong Kong,
       
         Tanzania,
       
         Spain,
       
         Ukraine,
       
         Bahrain,
       
         Netherlands,
       
         Oman,
       
         Poland,
       
         Finland,
       
         United States,
       
         Sweden,
       
         Latvia,
       
         Namibia,
       
         Japan,
       
         Switzerland,
       
         New Zealand,
       
         Russia,
       
         Brazil,
       
         Bulgaria,
       
         Côte d’Ivoire,
       
         Romania,
       
         Portugal,
       
         Estonia,
       
         Mexico,
       
         United Arab Emirates,
       
         South Africa,
       
         Lebanon,
       
         United Kingdom,
       
         Malaysia,
       
         Austria,
       
         China,
       
         Mozambique,
       
         Uganda,
       
         Greece,
       
         Burundi,
       
         Hungary,
       
         Taiwan,
       
         Cyprus
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
      where the wild things are,
    
      mickey,
    
      parade,
    
      walk,
    
      Animation,
    
      children’s book,
    
      milk,
    
      boat,
    
      Literature,
    
      Birthday,
    
      landscape,
    
      party,
    
      monsters,
    
      march,
    
      food,
    
      chefs,
    
      pigs,
    
      characters,
    
      world,
    
      Interactive,
    
      Art,
    
      in the night kitchen,
    
      bumble-ardy,
    
      cake
    
  

       http://bit.ly/v9YN86
Maurice Sendak’s 85th Birthday

Maurice Sendak's 85th Birthday

Date: June 10, 2013

Admired for his award-winning illustrations and beloved for his imaginative storytelling, Maurice Sendak is an American children’s book legend.  Whether they are monsters stomping through a forest, a boy cruising in a bread plane, or a parade of pigs celebrating a birthday, the unique characters of Sendak’s books have sparked the imaginations of children for decades.  His talents and ambitions, however, are not limited to children’s books.  He also created television shows and designed sets for operas and ballets.

To honor such a cherished cultural icon is no small task.  How can anyone sing the praises of Maurice Sendak with enough affection?  The doodlers and I decided to let Sendak’s characters do the talking, or the walking rather.  The doodle is a kind of parade— sixteen of his characters march through their stories and gather around a birthday cake decked with candles that read “85.”  Even his dog, Herman, makes an appearance to wish Maurice a warm happy birthday.

Below are some development drawings of the doodle.  As with any story, the doodle starts with storyboards.








The following images illustrate the evolution of the Where the Wild Things Are scene:




Finally, below are the fully-realized background paintings that appear throughout the doodle.  I was lucky enough to have a great collaborator in Mike Dutton for these images!







We hope that this doodle properly honors a man whose work continues to bring joy to a world of children and adults alike.  

Posted by Jennifer Hom, doodler

Location: Canada, Turkey, Qatar, Kenya, Kuwait, France, Congo [DRC], Rwanda, Ireland, Palestine, Argentina, Ghana, Brunei, Israel, Australia, Singapore, Senegal, Zimbabwe, Jordan, Germany, Iraq, Hong Kong, Tanzania, Spain, Ukraine, Bahrain, Netherlands, Oman, Poland, Finland, United States, Sweden, Latvia, Namibia, Japan, Switzerland, New Zealand, Russia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Côte d’Ivoire, Romania, Portugal, Estonia, Mexico, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Lebanon, United Kingdom, Malaysia, Austria, China, Mozambique, Uganda, Greece, Burundi, Hungary, Taiwan, Cyprus

Tags: where the wild things are, mickey, parade, walk, Animation, children’s book, milk, boat, Literature, Birthday, landscape, party, monsters, march, food, chefs, pigs, characters, world, Interactive, Art, in the night kitchen, bumble-ardy, cake

http://bit.ly/v9YN86

1 Notes

St. George’s Day 2013 

  
     
  Date: April 23, 2013
  
  Location:
     
       
         United Kingdom
       
    
  
  Tags:
    
      lance,
    
      National Holiday,
    
      shield,
    
      knight,
    
      horse,
    
      dragon,
    
      medieval,
    
      ornate,
    
      lady,
    
      History
    
  

       http://bit.ly/v9YN86
St. George’s Day 2013

St. George's Day 2013

Date: April 23, 2013

Location: United Kingdom

Tags: lance, National Holiday, shield, knight, horse, dragon, medieval, ornate, lady, History

http://bit.ly/v9YN86

29 Notes

'Google:Tube'
Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the London Underground

'Google:Tube'

Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the London Underground

3 Notes

The Maps app is important because it is an essential phone feature, a feature that almost everyone uses. Insofar as users have expectations, it’s shaped by how much they’ve come to rely on the app in their daily lives.

Raging Thunderbolt, in John Gruber Is A Smart Guy (Or, Maps).

He’s not wrong to state this, but a little historical perspective: at this point five years ago, the only phone that came with a mapping application installed was the iPhone, with its Maps application (coded by Apple, data from Google). Nokia at this point had begun to offer mapping applications (and built-in GPS), but my memory of trying to install one on an N73 (after they’d stopped charging for the app) was one of failing repeatedly.

If you go back just another five years, the state of the art was Streetmap and Mapquest, both of which had interfaces with what seems now to be startlingly primitive indirect manipulation: if you wanted to look a tile to the right, you clicked on the little arrow to the right of the maps. If you were very lucky you had a big enough screen to expand to a 5x5 view, instead of the default 3x3.

Nonetheless, maps are now essential. It doesn’t matter that this is a change that took less than five years; whether or not we deserve to feel entitled to them, we definitely miss it when they’re not there.